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Tuesday, December 1

  1. page Religion in Dublin edited ... http://www.boylans.com/ireland/conflict.html {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-scr…
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    Marlayna Kirby
    Catholicism played a large role in Dublin at the time of James Joyce. Religion dominated many political and social aspects of Ireland at the turn of the century. Ireland was predominantly poor and catholic.
    {http://searchinvented.com/__media__/images/3133_directi-gren-Church1.jpg} image1
    Currently the Catholic Church does not have as much influence in Ireland as it once did. This is due to scandals and the modernization of Ireland. Ireland does not produce as many priest as it once had, and other religions are starting to become larger.
    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0607090342jul09,0,3397459.story

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    8:39 pm

Monday, November 30

  1. msg Joyce's shtyle message posted Joyce's shtyle I agree in that religion is present throughout all stories. You can see that Joyce was greatly affe…
    Joyce's shtyle
    I agree in that religion is present throughout all stories. You can see that Joyce was greatly affected, (maybe in not such a good way) by the strong held Irish religion. I also agree with the reoccurring of the elderly giving advice to the youth. I think it is important to recognize, that in each story, the narrator being given the advice doesn’t necessarily seem to accept it. In “The Sisters” the narrator doesn’t speak at all, giving the sisters no recognition that he agrees with what they are saying. In “An encounter” the narrator simply thinks the old man is crazy and leaves, along with the friend going to chase a cat. In “Araby” the narrator runs out when the uncle says the quote “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Giving no indication that he was even listening when the uncle said that.
    4:03 pm
  2. msg James Joyce Dubliners message posted James Joyce Dubliners In “Dubliners” by James Joyce, The stories, “The Sisters”, “An Encounter”, and “Araby” all contain …
    James Joyce Dubliners
    In “Dubliners” by James Joyce, The stories, “The Sisters”, “An Encounter”, and “Araby” all contain peculiar events that remain unexplained. All three of these stories have the priests or religious figures in them. In “The Sisters” The entire story is based upon the reflection of a boy upon his dead priest as well as friend, Father Flynn. It is questionable to what relationship the boy and Father Flynn had before he was dead, leaving the story to question, giving the reader a sense of uncertainty. The boy literally kneels before this dead priests body also bringing up the reoccurring theme of paralysis, or the inability to act or to feel emotion.
    In “An Encounter” an old man is again brought up, this brings attention to the ambiguous relationship Father Flynn had in “The Sisters”, in “An Encounter”, the presence of the old man is uncomfortable as well, clearly showing the abuse of the innocence of youth and fun and games that the boys played like Wild West and Indians.
    In “Araby”, the narrator brings about this new and intense love for Mangan’s sister. Through a tiresome effort to finally get to the bazar, instead of realizing that he does not need a gift to express his love, the narrator simply gives up. “Araby” gives off a unfulfilled sentiment and portrays the loss of motivation to push forward for the Dubliners.
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  3. page Joyce's Life edited ... {webkit-fake-url://DD938567-3745-468F-ABE9-1D6866EFB3ED/joyce.gif} joyce.gif muahahaha http:/…
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    Joyce's life in Dublin
    Alexa Simpson, Period 4
    James Joyce, born in Dublin may have been greatly affected by his parents, John Stanislaus Joyce and Mary Jane Murray. Joyce’s father failed at most of all his professions, which included the distillery business, as well as tax collecting and politics. It seems that Joyce’s father was trying hard at many different things in order to support his family, but never really succeeded in any of them, which leaves question in whether or not Joyce had a good relationship with his father. Mary Jane Murray was a successful pianist who was ten years younger than John Joyce, the catholic church as well as her marriage over powered her life, giving James Joyce a difficult upbringing through poverty and possible problems with his parents. Joyce went to a Jesuit school despite his lack of faith in the particular religion. His upbringing in a Jesuit school may have been difficult for him because of his opposite beliefs and feelings towards the religion. Joyce felt it was necessary for him to leave Ireland to establish himself as a writer. Joyce also wanted to find the reality of experience, getting away from the poverty stricken upbringing and religion in which he did not hold strong.
    For Further information about James Joyce:
    link: http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/jjoyce.htm
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  5. page Religion in Dublin edited {ireland_dublin_church.jpg} Instructions: Research the role religion played in life in Joyc…
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    Instructions: Research the role religion played in life in Joyce's Dublin. What effects has Catholicism had on the Irish today and in Joyce's time?
    Andrew Hayden 11/23/09
    ...
    As a result of the essential takeover of Catholic Northern Ireland as well as a large area surrounding Dublin by Protestant England in the 14th and 15th Centuries, Irish citizens throughout the country were enraged by the implementing of British politics, tradition and religion in their formerly independent country. The vast majority of Ireland being Catholic, general hatred of Protestants (mostly English people) began to grow, and the two opposing sides began to fight each other for various lands in Ireland, particularly its largest city, Dublin.
    http://www.boylans.com/ireland/conflict.html {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-2.png}
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    {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-4.png} {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-5.png} {ireland_dublin_church.jpg}
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    2:50 pm
  6. page Religion in Dublin edited {ireland_dublin_church.jpg} Instructions: Research the role religion played in life in Joyc…
    {ireland_dublin_church.jpg}
    Instructions: Research the role religion played in life in Joyce's Dublin. What effects has Catholicism had on the Irish today and in Joyce's time?
    Andrew Hayden 11/23/09
    ...
    {http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0S020nDXBNLXPcA3LOjzbkF/SIG=15coieg3f/EXP=1259646531/**http%3A//www.tropicalisland.de/ireland/dublin/st_patricks_cathedral/images/DUB%2520Dublin%2520-%2520St%2520Patricks%2520Cathedral%252001%25203008x2000.jpg}
    Also see: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/172746/Dublin/60383/Religion
    Chris Johnk
    As a result of the essential takeover of Catholic Northern Ireland as well as a large area surrounding Dublin by Protestant England in the 14th and 15th Centuries, Irish citizens throughout the country were enraged by the implementing of British politics, tradition and religion in their formerly independent country. The vast majority of Ireland being Catholic, general hatred of Protestants (mostly English people) began to grow, and the two opposing sides began to fight each other for various lands in Ireland, particularly its largest city, Dublin.
    http://www.boylans.com/ireland/conflict.html
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    2:49 pm
  7. page Religion in Dublin edited ... {http://www.tommyjoyce.com/jamesjoyce.jpg} http://www.iol.ie/~dluby/ireland.htm#History4 {…
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    http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O245-religiousconflict.html
    Since the 16th century there has been religious conflict between the Catholics and Protestants in Ireland. Some of the disputes have been ongoing since the beginning of the conflict. During Joyce's first years of life, there were riots. And towards the later years of his life, the Anglo-Irish war and partition brought more violence into Ireland.
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    {http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0S020nDXBNLXPcA3LOjzbkF/SIG=15coieg3f/EXP=1259646531/**http%3A//www.tropicalisland.de/ireland/dublin/st_patricks_cathedral/images/DUB%2520Dublin%2520-%2520St%2520Patricks%2520Cathedral%252001%25203008x2000.jpg}
    Also see: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/172746/Dublin/60383/Religion
    As a result of the essential takeover of Catholic Northern Ireland as well as a large area surrounding Dublin by Protestant England in the 14th and 15th Centuries, Irish citizens throughout the country were enraged by the implementing of British politics, tradition and religion in their formerly independent country. The vast majority of Ireland being Catholic, general hatred of Protestants (mostly English people) began to grow, and the two opposing sides began to fight each other for various lands in Ireland, particularly its largest city, Dublin.
    http://www.boylans.com/ireland/conflict.html
    {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot.png} {file:///C:/Users/Carl/AppData/Local/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.png}

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    2:45 pm
  8. msg Dubliners Section I message posted Dubliners Section I All of the stories feature some sort of anonymity. “The Sisters” narrator is never identified, but …
    Dubliners Section I
    All of the stories feature some sort of anonymity. “The Sisters” narrator is never identified, but we are sure that he lives with his Aunt. The rest of the characters are either never identified or never related to the narrator. “An Encounter” also neglects to identify the narrator, but, instead, identifies the boy he ditched school with, “Joe Dillon”. “Araby” never discusses the name of the narrator, but it does discuss the narrators family, “My Uncle said that he was very sorry he had forgotten,” (253). They never go into much detail about people or setting, but rather they discuss how the narrator is seeing his setting at the time.
    The stories also all feature young boys as narrators. “The Sisters” narrator seems lost and dazed by the death of his priest, which shows youth, naivety and dependency. In “An Encounter”, the narrator ditches school, which shows immaturity. In “Araby”, the narrator is lost in the large world of the market and it is apparent that he doesn’t belong in that world.

    To Stanley: I like the connection you made to religion because religion was an integral part of life in Dublin. Religion affected every aspect of life because the majority of people were and are Roman Catholic. The dying of the priest in "The Sisters" is an interesting statement about Joyce's feelings about his personal religion.
    9:08 am

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